DC – Research Materials

images-2

There are some more iconic war images here.

I have decided to write my essay on the history of war photography. I want illustrate a number of different aspects from major conflicts over the past 170 yard or so. This basically covers the history of photography – 2014 being the 175th Anniversary of the 1st Photograph – and there are a number of salient issues.

For example the photography tends to reflect the prevailing mood of the time so for example in early conflicts such as Crimea and 1st World War are unfailingly positive for the side publishing the works. Later and in particular the American portrayal of their involvement in Vietnam became increasingly negative to the point by showing a more rounded view of the reality of the conflict (such as the Nick Ut photograph of a young girl burned by Napalm above) that public opinion was turned against the war and hastened its end. This had profound social consequences for the Vietnam veterans and led to much more control of the media in conflict situations.

Topics will include :-

Famous Photographers and images

Some photographers are famous for single iconic images such as Eddie Adams photograph of the execution of a Vietcong suspect, others for a body of work covering many years and conflicts such as Don McCullin.

** Insert Image here **

– Roger Fenton (Crimea)

– Gardener / Brady (American Civil War)

– Robert Capa (Spanish Civil War Onwards)

– Don McCullin (Vietnam Onwards)

– Eddie Adams / Nick UT   (Vietnam)

To support this work I have purchased a number of books on specific conflicts in addition to college library and internet based research of images.

Books Acquired :-

– Gardeners Photographic Sketch Book of the [American] Civil War.

– First World War in Pictures

– World War II : A photographic history.

– Glass Warriors : The Camera at War

– Its War – Anniversary Pamphlet on declaration of 2nd world War in Britain.

 

 

 

This entry was posted in Critical Study.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*